Category Archives: Kindergarten

6 easy, yummy recipes for hungry kids after kindergarten

When kindergarten is over and home gets closer, the kids are suddenly hungry and will want food NOW. Luckily for you, we have a collection of healthy recipes that’ll result in something delicious and nutritious.

 

Something savoury

If your child doesn’t have a sweet-tooth and doesn’t eat the birthday cupcakes at kindergarten, try some of these. You won’t have to swing by the bakery on the way home if you have a savoury muffin or a scroll in the tupperware container.

 

 

savoury muffins kindergarten

Cheese, mushrooms, capsicum, and ham come together to make these tasty muffins that’ll last for a few days Pack them in the lunchbox for morning tea/lunch and freeze some for a handy snack when you run out of other stuff.

 

 

pizza scrolls

Who doesn’t have a soft spot for pizza! This is a portion-controlled, savoury indulgence the kids will love. Just some puff pastry, tomato paste, and cheese make the basic version, but you can add extras as you like. Try some classic ham or even zucchini.

 

 

Savoury toast

When in doubt, get the toaster out! Australians love all-day breakfast, so of course it’s okay to have it for afternoon tea as well! Besides eggs and avo, there’s options like pureed pinto beans, and cheese and nacho toast. You can’t go wrong with cheese and Vegemite, either.

Sweet Stuff

Of course, you can’t forget the sweet stuff. Lots of products on the supermarket shelf are full of refined sugar. You can cut this out, as well as the extra cost, when you make your own versions at home.

 

 

sweet toast

They’re sweet but healthy, and have a little extra crispy crunch. From the fruit face to the peanut butter bear (a Pinterest fave, apparently), there’s close to a dozen options to choose from after the kids get home from kindergarten.

 

donna hay muffins

If Donna Hay says it’s great for her kids, who are we to argue? Banana and blueberry muffins serve that sweet tooth nicely without overdoing it on the sugar. You can have one yourself with a cup of tea while the kids are at daycare.

 

 

ants on a log

A bit sweet, a bit savoury, all interesting. These celery and cream cheese sticks are too easy to put together. Your children will get lots of different flavours and textures all in one snack!

 

4 amazing story collections for kindergarten and home

Any of the below books are appropriate for kindergarten shelves, quiet reading time and even bed time stories. There’s so many amazing books to choose from, but you’ll agree that the below four will reappear in your child’s hands over and over again.

kindergatren books

Enid’s books transport both adults and children alike to a land of magic, where amazing lands come and go at the top of a Magic Faraway Tree. Joe, Bessie, and Fanny’s adventures have taken them to the Land of Treats, the Land of Dreams, and even the Land of Tempers!

The Magic Faraway Tree trilogy was first published in 1943 and continues to captivate readers today, both in kindergarten and at home.

 

kindergarten books

After publishing Possum Magic in 1983, Mem Fox hasn’t stopped writing despite her busy career as a literary professor. She’s an advocate for children’s literacy and encourages parent/child bonding through reading, even through something as simple as a bedtime story.

 

Her most recent book I’m Australian Too tackles the perception of what it means to be Australian, no matter your cultural background. Her other books, like Wombat Magic and Whoever You Are, also highlight that it’s fine to be different, but important to be included.  Messages like this are vital during the kindergarten/preschool years.

 

kindergarten books

Wonka Bars, Oompa Loompas, fantastic foxes, and a girl who can move things with her mind; Roald Dahl’s stories are good for children moving onto big school. They’re also great as  stories for parents to read after the kids get home from kindergarten.

 

kindergarten books

The tale of the Rainbow Serpent has endured from the Dreamtime, passed down over thousands of years. The Serpent was believed to have risen from under the ground and created some of the modern landscapes seen in the outback today. The legend endures today and the picture book by D Roughsey is a staple on kindergarten/preschool shelves.

Kindergarten and beyond; teaching values and discipline

It’s important during the early years, even before kindergarten and big school, to set a routine for your children and yourself. That way your days are structured and there’s little chaos. In theory, at least. In reality, there’s hundreds of little things that can send routines into a spin and you run out of time to do certain things. Teaching your children the value of routine, discipline and respect will benefit them for the rest of their lives.

 

  • Set up a ‘chore chart’

Children aren’t used to responsibility, and that’s why it’s essential to teach them this through their kindergarten years. Have a chart on the wall somewhere, decorated with colours or something cheery, that lists jobs that every member of the family must do. For the little ones, it doesn’t have to be too big. Something as simple as setting the table will do.

As they grow up, add jobs to the list, or other tasks they have to complete. This will eventually include homework, music/sports practice, and even taking out the rubbish. Having a points and rewards system is an incentive for good behaviour.

 

  • Make a set time for bed and eating

These routines are important after the children graduate kindergarten. While Eskay doesn’t have set eating times, ‘big school’ will and it’s important that kids understand it.

It’s also essential for children to get enough sleep. Young ones need 10-12 hours a night. They won’t get nap time in school, unlike kindergarten, so having a solid rest (combined with a good breakfast) stops any dozing off during class.

 

  • Enforce good manners

Children are very impressionable and copy what they see without understanding the context or consequences. This is especially mortifying if they’re copying bad manners.

Parents will take the initiative to teach their children the importance of ‘please’ and ‘thank you’ at home, and teachers certainly encourage it at kindergarten and big school.

 

  • Not everyone’s the same

Everyone has different values, speaks different languages, and has a different family dynamic. In Australia, this is especially true. During kindergarten, children learn to respect the opinions and backgrounds of others as part of the Early Years Learning Framework. It’s important to carry this on when kindy finishes to make sure your child understands how large the world is, and everyone in it is unique.

 

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Slowing down our day with tea parties

Taking the time to slow down with children is of pretty high importance in my eyes…. time that allows for us to connect with each other on a deeper level. It is often something we can lose sight of in the rush of our day. Having a tea party allows for this time and can offer an insight into children’s thoughts and feelings. Discussions allow us to get to know children on a more intimate level. For me, this is far more important than setting up activity after activity, which can distract children from learning to regulate their emotions.

When I arrive I often walk in to musings from the children….. “Can we have a tea party?”, “Is it too wet for us to have a fire?”, “Did you bring marshmallows or food for the fire?”. This gives me an insight into how our day will unfold, and what I will be helping them prepare.

Children will often discuss amongst themselves the type of fruit or herbal tea they want.  They are gaining familiarity with the different types, and most of the time the tea has been selected before I even arrive. As well as picking the tea they are able to choose from our selection of tea cups and pots. Most of our tea sets have been donated by families of the centre. The different tea sets are known by the different families who have brought them in. All beautiful and unique and very special to us. Once we have got everything together, we move to gather as a community around our yarning circle. As soon as the tea sets come out the children follow. I feel a bit like the pied piper walking with our tea filled tea pots, and the children in tow.

It is not necessarily part of our everyday play, however most days we have been having bigger and bigger tea parties. Winter has also been a great opportunity to use our fire knowledge and sometimes boil the water over the fire….  again bringing children and adults together, yarning about their morning and plans for the remainder of the day.  Once we have gathered together and had our cup of tea and a bit of chit-chat, the children generally take off and resume play.  I find this experience can also be a wonderful opportunity for children who may struggle to enter group situations.  

Our tea parties have really helped to create an overall sense of calm throughout the centre and bring us together. I think they have also made a real difference to my own “at peace” feeling.

Holly Wells

Karana

Why go to our kindergarten in Capalaba?

Kindergarten is a German word, which translates to ‘children’s garden’ in English. If you look around for a kindergarten in Capalaba, you’ll find Eskay Kids. We also have centres in Springfield and Karana Downs, and all of our kindergartens have the same mission: To give the children in our care the best possible childhood.

 

Kindergarten, or ‘kindy’, helps ease the transition from home to school for parents and children alike. Kindy originated in 19th century Bavaria as a place for working parents to leave their children. It was a safe environment where the children could learn, interact with different people (other children, teachers), and play.

 

Eskay Kids’ kindergarten in Capalaba is equipped with both indoor and outdoor classrooms.  It’s a common sight to see our children running barefoot through the playground, making figures in the sandpit, or making cubbies. The children are afforded agency which empowers them to make decisions about their day.  Children’s voices are respected and their choices are real.  Children become good problem solvers, by learning to solve problems.  Children become good decision makers, by learning to make decisions.  We partner with children, and work with them to support their interests, curiosities, enquiries and questions.  Programs across our service are documented using the Floorbook approach (by Claire Warden), and consultation with children is the cornerstone of our practice.   

 

Of course, there’s also excursions. Eskay Kids has begun exploring beyond the fence.  We’ve organised our first trips to Bunnings Warehouse, and are in the planning stages of taking our children to “the beyond”. Excursions gives children the opportunity to actively engage with the world and their community around them.

 

Our kindergartens in Capalaba, Springfield, and  Karana Downs don’t have stencils, ‘classroom time’ or anything else that is highly structured and developmentally inappropriate.  Eskay appreciates that children are curious and our centres provide a safe place for them to learn, grow, become confident,make friends, and have beautiful, authentic childhoods  before that inevitable first day of school.