Tag Archives: advice

More tips for raising confident kids

Not long ago we posted an article on how to raise confident kids at any age, whether they be in kindergarten or big school. Confident kids blossom into young people who get through challenges and learn valuable life lessons.

 

Let them make mistakes

Young children who are preschool age are more resilient than you think. How many scraped knees have you patched up, only for your son or daughter to go running back outside with a big grin on their face?

Don’t swoop in to rescue your child when they make a small mistake. They’ll learn. You won’t be there to hold their hand all the time and fix things. Mistakes always happen no matter their age. In preschool, they walk through the house with muddy feet. When they’re a teenager they’ll forget to fill up the car with petrol. Let your son or daughter make mistakes. Remind them not to do it again (gently). And they’ll remember.

 

Moderate social media

We live in a digital age where children are exposed to more screens than ever. It’s commonplace to see a four-year-old with an iPad instead of a book. Granted, sometimes it’s the only way to distract an unsettled child when you need to concentrate. But lock the Facebook feature so they can only play educational/fun games instead.

Capping their exposure to social media use is a responsible measure. Body image and life satisfaction issues are on the rise among young people, some of them as young as primary-school-age.

 

Ask them to contribute

You do a lot of jobs around the house when the kids are at school or watching television. Sometimes they might even want to help you, but more often they get in your way.

Don’t brush them off, though. Raising a confident child involves giving them (age appropriate) responsibilities. Phrase it like:

‘You would help me very much if you picked up your toys when you’re done.’

Positive reinforcement works

When you selectively praise certain behaviour, your child knows they’ve done a good job and will keep doing it well. Thank them for being on their best behavior in public. Same for putting their toys away or making the bed.

 

Keep up the cuddles

Everyone needs human contact, especially children. Even when you’re busy, give your child a cuddle. It’ll make you both feel good at the end of a long day.

Daycare to big school: are you ready for it?

Graduating from daycare is a momentous day for parents and children alike, and the next step is just as big. Big school. The change in routine and a new environment will be startling for your son or daughter. Luckily, there’s useful tips out there by experts to help them ease into their new learning environment.

 

The big changes

  • Learning environment

Primary school introduces children to a formal learning environment for the first time with set hours, a curriculum, and a whole new place to explore. The environment itself is strange initially, the furniture is bigger and the learning aids (books, posters) are more advanced.

 

  • Rules

We’re not just talking about rules of behaviour. Children learn good manners at home, way before daycare or big school. We’re talking about rules surrounding school routine. Unlike daycare, schools have periods where kids are taught certain subjects. There’s time for morning tea and lunch whereas before, at daycare, kids would eat when they were hungry.

Your child will learn classroom etiquette, too. This includes raising hands, lining up neatly, and listening for long periods of time.

 

  • New relationships

A new school means building new relationships. Children who go to the same daycare together mightn’t go to the same school after they graduate. Your child will have to face not only making new friends but also getting used to the new teachers. Daycare is a smaller, more intimate environment with a few educators for one group of children. School has different teachers for different grades and subjects that your child will meet within days.

 

Supporting them

Your son or daughter is going to feel overwhelmed with the changes they face and there’s ways you can help them manage.

 

  • Do homework together

Doing this with your child has several benefits, including bonding time and promoting essential skills like literacy and numeracy. Also practice hand-eye coordination like cutting up items with scissors and stacking building blocks to make a small house.

 

  • Give them space

Little brains get exhausted quickly. Though you’re eager to hear about their first day, let your son or daughter just sit and breathe for a moment or two. Follow their lead. If they’re bursting to tell you about their day, then great! But if they look like they’re asleep on their feet, give them a snack and put them in comfy clothes when you get home.

 

  • Meet other parents

Making friends at a new school isn’t just for the children. Parents also make fast friends before the term begins, usually during open days and information nights. Bonding over shared anxieties about the first day of school will soon turn into sharing the pickup/drop off and arranging play times at each other’s houses.

The beginning of the new school year is a time for parents to make new friends