Tag Archives: communication

5 Tips to Help Your Children Adjust to Kindergarten

There are many leading child care centre Karana that will help in making the transition from daycare to kindergarten smooth. The initial days of kindergarten may be tiring, emotional, and overwhelming for the entire family. So, below you will find some tips that will come in handy for kids and help them accept the new phase and keep tantrums at bay:

1. Don’t Ask Too Many Questions:

Don’t bombard your children with several queries as they may end up getting irritated. You may find it tough initially but soon you will develop patience. You should wait for the time when your baby starts discussing the activities at Kindergarten on their own accord. The leading day care centre Karana will stop at nothing to make this phase memorable for your child. You need not worry that your children will feel sad as expert teachers take steps to help all the kids feel at ease.

2. Introduce Relevant Activities at Home:

It may prove helpful if you talk to your child in an exciting manner about preschool’s activities before they begin. You can gradually introduce the activities that usually begin in a classroom. If your child is used to scribbling with colours and copies at home, they will find it exciting to find out the same colours and copies in the preschool classroom.

3. Visit the Classroom with Your Kids:

Visiting the classroom before your child begins will help in eradicating the fearful feelings of stepping into completely new territory. Your child will become more comfortable with the idea if they have already been there and begin accepting the new building and atmosphere before it actually starts. These visits will also provide the perfect opportunity to ask questions and help them become accustomed to their teacher.

4. Read Preschool Books at Home:

You can buy preschool books that your child will actually see in the classroom. Reading the same books as the kindergarten teachers will allow your child to become more and more comfortable and relaxed with the transition.

5. Be a Few Minutes Early to Pick Your Child Up:

This is something very important. When children come out of their school and can’t see their parents, they can get worried and anxious.

Final Thoughts:

These small steps may look very small to you but they will go a long way in preparing your child for Kindergarten. These milestones will help in making early childhood education Karana memorable and full of fun, excitement, and sheer joy. Moreover, parents will be able to relax and feel happy for their children opposed to feeling worries or sad.

Stage Fright – How to Help Your Child Through It

Does your child express anxiety before school concerts or soccer games? While butterflies can be normal for children to experience, if you suspect your child is having anxiety before having to perform, this can be concerning. At such a young age you don’t want your children to experience severe stress, so this article will discuss the signs and symptoms of Performance Anxiety and some ways you can help your children to calm down and approach things differently. If you can get your child to take control of their anxiety at a young age, it can put them on a healthy path for their later years when managing stress becomes crucial.

When does it go from Nerves to Performance Anxiety?

It can be difficult to differentiate between what most people consider “nerves” and the more severe form of stage fright, performance anxiety. For children especially, they themselves find it tricky to articulate their feelings, as they don’t really know what they mean. As a parent, it’s important to recognise the signs and symptoms of performance anxiety:

  • Sweating before going on stage
  • Tummy aches
  • Racing Heart
  • Headaches
  • Crying
  • Fear, Frustration and or Anger

 

Steps to Help your Child Fight Stage Fright

It’s extremely unhealthy to ignore your child’s symptoms, if they are experiencing any. Sometimes the most helpful thing for them is support and often a support system can make all the difference in assisting them to calm down.

Talk about it

If your child displays any of the above-mentioned symptoms, it is important to begin by opening into a calm, honest and empathetic conversation with them about it. Ask your child how they feel about performing (whether it’s soccer, ballet, public speaking etc) and whether they feel any unpleasant feelings when having to perform. Listen to them and be gentle and kind. The most important message to send to your child is that what they are experiencing is normal and that many others feel the exact same way.

 

Encourage them to Face it

While the immediate response may be to stop doing whatever it is that is making them anxious, this is not going to help them at all as there are a multitude of things they might come across in life that give them anxiety – some of which they have to face. It’s crucial from a young age to encourage them to keep at it and assist them in building confidence. However, there are exceptions. If it is an activity that they really don’t enjoy and it’s causing a lot of distress it may be best to stop.

 

Calming Down in the Moment

If your child loves the activity but just has trouble when it comes to the pointy end of things, practice calming your child down, by doing things that lower the heartbeat; speaking softly, going for a walk, meditating, telling them a story (distraction is always good) etc.

For some families, stage fright can be expressed in a normal way but for other families it can cause sleepless nights, crying and agony experienced by the whole family. The latter is not healthy and requires immediate attention, the above-mentioned ways of dealing with it can help to minimise stress levels and assist the whole family towards peace.

 

 

 

 

How to Communicate More Effectively with Your Children

As a parent there are of course, good and bad days. Children can be tricky, especially when you have more than just one to attend to. Communicating isn’t always easy, and general emotional intelligence differences can cause communication barriers between yourself and your children – especially if they are at a young age. Sometimes life gets busy and we unknowingly put less emphasis on communicating properly with our children. Shutting children down when you can’t understand them is a common response when we aren’t in the mood or are slightly annoyed at them (if they’ve been naughty or disobedient). However, there are simple ways to ensure your communication is always smooth with your children no matter the situation. So, this article will give you some tips on how to communicate more effectively with your children.

 

Effective Communication Tips:

  • Children often need some help learning to listen, as well as some gentle reminders about letting other people talk. So, in order to teach your child how to listen let your child finish talking and then respond. This sets a good example of listening for your child.
  • Encourage children to talk about their feelings — both positive and negative — and discuss the possible causes for those emotions.
  • When children are talking to themselves, let them be. Self-talk helps them focus on what they are doing.
  • Use language and ideas that your child will understand as it can be hard for your child to keep paying attention if they don’t understand what you’re talking about. Additionally, when explaining things, use examples or stories that you think they will be interested in listening to and learning about. This will make it easier for it to sink in.
  • Make any instructions and requests simple and clear to match your child’s age and ability.
  • Avoid criticism and blame. If you’re angry about something your child has done, try to explain why you want them not to do it again. Appeal to their sense of empathy.
  • Be a good role model. Your child learns how to communicate by watching you carefully. When you talk with your child (and others) in a respectful way, this gives a powerful message about positive communication.
  • Don’t raise your voice unless there’s a genuine reason for it, this then emphasises when you are really angry and when they have done something wrong. It will be a shock to them when you do raise your voice and they won’t like it and won’t want to make you raise your voice again.
  • When your child is telling you something important, get down to their level, even sit down with them and really listen to what they’re saying. This shows you that you care about what they have to say, and that it’s important to really focus on people when they’re speaking to you. This sets an important example for them.
  • Don’t put too much pressure on your children in any sense. Don’t be too hard on them or

 

These tips should help you to understand how children work a little better and potentially some things that you as a parent can improve on to help your children learn how to communicate more effectively.

 

Communicating with your children, post-daycare

Children in daycare are still learning how to communicate properly. Their grammar is developing (missing articles like ‘the’, ‘a’ and ‘to’ are common) but they can communicate their wants and needs effectively. Here are some tips to help them along after you pick them up from daycare. Children are always learning, after all.

 

Kids want to chat

Curiosity keeps the kids going! It drives them during their daily activities. They’ll read books, arrange loose parts to see how they fit together and pick flowers out of the yards.

When you pick them up after your day, there are two things that will happen. Your son or daughter will be really chatty, or really tired. If it’s the former, they’ll be bursting to tell you about their exciting day. And that brings us to the next point.

 

Ask them real questions

Open-ended questions are the best approach. Also, do your best to avoid generic questions like ‘how was your day?’. Here are some examples you can try next time you’re driving home;

  • What was your favourite part of playtime today?
  • What was your favorite thing at lunch?
  • What books did you read?
  • Did you make anything with your friends today?
  • Did you do anything fun with your teacher?

Bonus tip; point number two can help you pack something different if they didn’t like what’s in their lunchbox. You don’t want them to spend their time in daycare with something they don’t want to eat.

 

Give them real answers

Children ask questions. ‘Why’ is going to be heard a lot in your household! This will happen when you give a ‘no’ answer to a request, like if they can go outside and play.

If you don’t know the answer to what your child is asking, say ‘Let’s Google it together’ and read the answer aloud to them. You’re bonding and learning something new all in one go.

Watch their body language

Children use body language more than words because the latter is still developing. As their example, it’s important for you to use gestures, facial expressions, and other body languages in your interactions with them. If your child can’t verbalize what they want, but you can guess, ask them a question.

Most of what people say and mean is communicated through body language rather than words. But the latter is just as important. Watch your son or daughter closely, ignoring outside distractions even in the car. If they don’t want to talk, they’ll be tired or restless as opposed to enthusiastic.